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New Orleans Bowl           A.T. performs The National Anthem at The New Orleans Bowl NCAA Game December 21, 2013 
Allen Toussaint & Gibson Guitar Collaborations with / Songs covered by Elvis Costello, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Band, Paul McCartney, Aaron Neville, Dr. John, Jerry Garcia, Phish, Plant / Krauss and scores of others.
Allen Toussaint and Elvis Costello Collaborations with / Songs covered by Elvis Costello, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Band, Paul McCartney, Aaron Neville, Dr. John, Jerry Garcia, Phish, Plant / Krauss and scores of others.

Welcome

The Official Web Site of Allen Toussaint

Come in and enjoy the life and music of Allen Toussaint. You are about to experience one of the music world's treasures.  The Southern Knight has led a surge of music that spans five decades.  Collaborations with / Songs covered by Elvis Costello, The Rolling Stones, Patti Labelle, The Who, The Band, Paul McCartney, Aaron Neville, Dr. John, Jerry Garcia, Phish, Plant / Krauss and scores of others.

The Toussaint Family Continue to Thank You For All The Love And Support & Please Check Back Regularly to See The New Things To Come To Keep The Spirit and Music Of Allen Toussaint Living!

 Allen Toussaint & Stokes

Music Playing: Go Back Home

 

“My music is homegrown from the garden of

New Orleans. Music is everything to me short of breathing.

Music also has a role to lift you up - not to be escapist but to

take you out of misery” -Allen Toussaint

 

 

"He was such an influential songwriter and performer," Jagger tweeted!

 

"I don't want y'all thinkin' 'this is just some old legend that passed away' naw," Questlove, founding member of the hip-hop group The Roots, wrote on Instagram.

"This dude wrote some of your favorite music & you just didn't know it."

Toussaint's influence is woven through popular music and hip-hop, he wrote.

"At least 12 'Get Out My Life Woman' snares were like starch in hip hop's daily nutritional chart -- meaning so there you barely notice it," Questlove wrote.

                                          "I'm still in shock and heartbroken after hearing of the news of the passing of my longtime friend, brother in music, teacher, mentor and most gentle person you'll ever                                                                          meet, Allen Toussaint.  He was a true musical treasure and legend that New Orleans shared with the world. Thank you Allen for all the music, good times and                                                                                       the legacy you leave behind for everyone to continue to enjoy. Rest in Peace. Peace & Love,"   Art "Poppa Funk" Neville                                            

                                      "Music lovers around the world today are mourning the passing of the legendary Allen Toussaint. He was one of the architects of rhythm and blues; a writer of many of                                                                        America's most well-known and beloved early rock and roll songs. I had the pleasure of hosting him at the Aspen Songwriters Festival some years ago and was                                                                                   honored to be able to perform with him and witness his inspired one man show. Sending love to his family and friends around the world - he will be missed by millions                                        but his music will never die." - John Oates

     “Probably no city’s contribution to American popular music has been more distinctive than New Orleans’,” longtime Washington Post rock critic Richard Harrington once wrote,

      “and Toussaint, as prolific songwriter, arranger and producer, has been a key shaper of its legacy.”

The Rock Hall described Toussaint as “a producer, bandleader, arranger, songwriter, session musician and all-around musical eminence.”

The Hall added that “although he was inducted in the ‘nonperformer’ category, Toussaint is a talented pianist and performer who has recorded under his own name.”

 

                                                                       

 

 

 

Allen Toussaint

WWOZ's Two-Part Allen Toussaint Special, Thursday, January 14

"Allen Toussaint Day"

 

 

      Allen Toussaint at Jazz Fest 2005 [Photo by Leon Morris]Allen Toussaint at Jazz Fest 2005 [Photo by Leon Morris]


 

Allen Toussaint in the French Quarter, April 2015 [Photo by Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee]

Allen Toussaint in the French Quarter, April 2015 [Photo by Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee]

Last week, the New Orleans City Council unanimously passed a resolution declaring Thursday, January 14 to be 'Allen Toussaint Day' in the city of New Orleans. On what would have been his 78th birthday, the whole city will celebrate one of the finest musical ambassadors New Orleans ever had.

As part of the celebration, WWOZ is airing two back-to-back episodes of New Orleans Calling, paying tribute to Allen, starting at 2p. Part One, featuring the story of Allen Toussaint in his own words, is also available for online streaming now at neworleanscalling.org. Part Two features the voices of his collaborators and friends, including Irma Thomas, the Meters, and others, and will become available online after it airs on Thursday.

Toussaint passed away unexpectedly while on tour in Spain on November 10, 2015. A stirring and emotional tribute to his life happened at the Orpheum Theater on Friday, November 20 with performances and words from many of his talented friends, including Cyril Neville, Deacon John, Irma Thomas, John Boutte, Boz Scaggs, Davell Crawford, Jimmy Buffett, Elvis Costello, and more.

Listen to WWOZ: http://www.wwoz.org/blog/408536

Allen Toussaint

Allen Toussaint at Blues & BBQ Fest, 2015
 

 

                                                         Tap Jazz Fest Banner For Line Up!

 

The Song Book

 BLU NOTES

Larry Blumenfeld on jazz and other sounds

BLU NOTES: Larry Blumenfeld on jazz and other sounds

      

Allen Toussaint Sings His Own Songbook

 
 

 

I’ve encountered Allen Toussaint in the middle of the Fair Grounds, the site of the annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, on a sweltering day, looking nonetheless cool and unruffled in a blazer and ascot. I remember running into him in Manhattan, as light snow fell, in 2006, after he’d been forced to relocate to New York City, hailing a cab in a neat suit and polka-dot tie, seeming serene despite all else. I’ve heard him whip up old-school R&B frenzy at the Fair Grounds, listened to him stun a packed house into observant silence at Manhattan’s Village Vanguard jazz club.

Last month, President Obama awarded Toussaint the National Medal of Arts for “his contributions as a composer, producer, and performer,” according to the White House website, and “sustaining his city’s rich tradition of rhythm and blues and lifting it to the national stage.” At 75, Toussaint embodies the New Orleans tradition of blending styles to create timeless hits, picking up whereFats Domino left off in the 1950s. Since the 1960s, he has created scores of hits for a stunningly wide range of musicians, from the Lee Dorsey’s 1960s classic “Working in the Coalmine” to 2006’s “River in Reverse” with Elvis Costello, and including Dr. John, Patti LaBelle and Glen Campbell (“Southern Nights”).

There’s a great recent chapter to Toussaint’s career—as a solo performer and bandleader. This will be highlighted when he performs at Lincoln Center Out of Doors (8/11) and through the release of the CD/DVD set “Songbook,” due from Rounder September 24.

This latest chapter began in 2005. As writer Ashley Kahn explains in the liner notes to “Songbook”:

With a honed sense of dry humor, Toussaint calls 2005’s Hurricane Katrina his booking agent, crediting the storm for rebooting his career as a performer after flooding him out of home and studio. In order to recover – financially, musically, spiritually – Toussaint relocated to New York City and began to perform solo concerts, using Joe’s Pub on Lafayette Street as a home base. Buoyed by a groundswell of support, he worked at something that years of success in the studio had allowed him to avoid: getting truly comfortable on the stage by himself, laying claim to his own songs.

Modesty had a lot to do with it; Allen Toussaint still is not the first person one would go to for information on Allen Toussaint. “I’m not accustomed to talking about myself,” he once explained during a gig, “I talk in the studio with musicians. Or through my songs.”

And there’s some great, compact history included by Kahn in his track-by-track notes, like this bit:

With Toussaint, no experience was wasted, not even a two-year stint in the military that began in 1963. In ’64, he took his army band into the studio and under the name of The Stokes recorded “Whipped Cream,” a snappy instrumental with a jaunty horn line and a distinctive trumpet lead. Herb Alpert jumped on the melody a year later for the Tijuana Brass, recording it note-for-note, creating a hit single, a memorable album cover and a theme song for the TV sensation The Dating Game.

Toussaint talks about this in the DVD portion of “Songbook” (the CD documents two performances at Joe’s Pub, from 2009); he’ll also discuss it at Lincoln Center in a pre-concert interview with Nona Hendryx. Bill Bragin, who formerly programmed Joe’s Pub and who was responsible for Toussaint’s long residency there, produces this weekend’s Lincoln Center show. He formed a bond with the pianist as general manager of NYNO Records, which Toussaint founded in the 1990s with Joshua Feigenbaum. I’m sorry I’ll be out of town for this weekend’s performance and interview. But I’m about to dig into this new release, and I’m sure to speak at length with Toussaint about it.

Photo: Glade Bilby II

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 Follow the Southern Knight on Twitter;  @AllenToussaint  we are shooting for 20,000 followers by feb 15.  Be on the look out for shows near you!  Life, Lve & Faith

   

Billboard-LIVE | ビルボードライブ

Hello日本ます。 南部騎士ライブ掲示板に戻る東京と大阪にある!
生命、!!愛と信仰

 

   

Oh Yeah Tour

  

 

 

Oh Yeah! Tour featuring New Orleans Legends Preservation Hall Jazz Band and Allen Toussaint, Coming to a Theatre Near You ! 

   

Allen Toussaint receiving the Medal of Honor for the Arts from President Obama July 10, 2013 at the White House

                            

  President awards Louisiana artists

 

July 11, 2013

President Barack Obama on Wednesday bestowed prestigious National Medal of Arts to famed New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint, Louisiana author Ernest J. Gaines, and Lake Charles-raised playwright and “Lincoln” screenwriter Tony Kushner.

“Star Wars” creator George Lucas was among nine others also honored in White House ceremonies.

Obama called it a special treat to honor all the musicians, writers, directors, artists and others who have inspired him and the rest of the nation.

“Frankly, this is just fun for me, because I feel like I know you all because I’ve enjoyed your performances,” Obama said. “Your writings have fundamentally changed me — I think for the better.”

Obama singled out Gaines, 80, who is best known for his novels “A Lesson Before Dying” and “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” along with singer and pianist Toussaint, 75, for their inspirations.

“Somebody like Allen Toussaint, who is being honored here for his incredible contributions to the rhythm and blues and jazz music of his beloved New Orleans,” Obama said. “After his hometown was battered by Katrina and Allen was forced to evacuate, he did something even more important for his city — he went back. And since then, Allen has devoted his musical talent to lifting up and building up a city. And today, he’s taking the stage all over the world, with all kinds of incredible talent, doing everything he can to revive the legendary soul of the Big Easy.”

Obama then praised Gaines for rising up and thriving after being born into a sharecropper family on a plantation in Pointe Coupee Parish.

“He did not let that define his future. Instead, he took that experience and used it to help fill in gaps in American literature with the stories of African-American life,” Obama said. “And then, Ernest moved back to Louisiana, onto the very same land he and his family had once worked. And he spent more than 20 years teaching college students to find their own voices and reclaiming some of the stories of their own families and their own lives.”

Afterward, Toussaint called the day historic and said that getting the Medal of Arts from the president was the greatest award he could receive.

“I’m so glad that America treats its own in such fine fashion,” Toussaint said. “It’s absolutely wonderful. And the president and the first lady as hosts, they are impeccable.”

“Me being from Louisiana, I feel all of where I’m from wherever I am,” he added. “As I was there receiving my award, I was thinking of New Orleans and Louisiana, etcetera.”

Although Toussaint, Gaines and Kushner had never met before Wednesday, Toussaint said it is “wonderful” for multiple people with state ties to receive recognition and get a chance to learn more about each other. “When the saints go marching in, here we are,” he said.

Kushner, 56, grew up in Louisiana and graduated from Lake Charles High School. He is a Pulitzer Prize winner for his play “Angels in America,” and has been nominated for an Academy Award this year for his screenplay for “Lincoln.” Kushner first met Obama last year when he visited the White House for a private screening.

“Out of any award I’ve ever gotten, this is the most meaningful by far,” Kushner said of the Medal of Arts. “It’s thrilling for me to be honored by the government of my country and that it’s a national award means a lot.

“I’m incredibly thrilled to be honored by President Obama, who I consider to be one of our genuinely great presidents. Other than Abraham Lincoln, I can’t think of another president I’d rather receive a medal from,” Kushner added.

Kushner also spoke fondly of growing up in Lake Charles.

“It was a great blessing to grow up in Louisiana, and I think it heightened my awareness of the beauty of the world because it’s such a beautiful place,” he said. “I love the people I grew up with. I think being a Southern writer had an enormous impact on the way that I speak and the kind of lyricism that I aspire to.”

Kushner said he also was influenced by growing up in the state during the civil-rights era and witnessing school integration and busing.

“I got to see the federal government in action, and I got to see that you can mandate certain social transformation and that people can surprise themselves with how much more advanced they are than they actually realize,” Kushner said.

The National Endowment for the Arts was established by the Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. The endowment has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities

 

   

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